Why I wrote a poem about Tristan…

Tristan is not a person that I wrote about in my poem. In fact, Tristan is a volcanic island and what is called the remotest island in the world. The island officially is called Tristan da Cunha. I sometimes get views from a little island called “Isle of Man” on my blog so I was researching and looking at pictures of Isle of Man yesterday when I stumbled across an article about the most remote island in the world.

My fascination for remote locations around the world and the people who live there has always captured my attention since I was very young. I too feel very comfortable in isolated places such as sand dunes, beaches, isolated towns in the middle of the jungle etc. Usually in these place, you are able to let your cerebral intellect run wild whilst taking in the sounds of nature, the authenticity of old traditions of people and ability to be far away from any modern day stresses. I think that’s why I have always felt so free in such places; these places quench my spirit and allow me to purify my mind, body and soul. Let’s find out a little more about Tristan, shall we?

TristanMap

Tristan is part of a group of volcanic islands, but is the main island where the citizens of Tristan live. Tristan is a British overseas territory but governed by Saint Helena.

Tristanview

The view approaching Tristan from a boat. There are no airports on Tristan.

Tristanpopulation

There’s a population less than 300 people who live on the island. There are 80 families with names like Glass, Green, Swain, Lavarello, Repetto, Rogers and Hagan.

A man sets aside his best potatoes for planting.
A man sets aside his best potatoes for planting.

Currency was not available until recently. Before, potatoes were the main form of currency with the families all bartering with each other. There is a location called “The Patches” 3 miles away from town where everyone goes on the weekend to pick potatoes. In this community, if you needed flowers to put on your loved ones graves, all you would have to do is to ask your neighbors if you could pick some of their flowers in their yard. There isn’t a floral shop, people share here. If someone hunts and catches food, he will share with the community. Here, people talk to one another when they pass their neighbor; to walk by one another with an acknowledgment is considered rude. This is a very tight knit community who love the fact they are isolated from the rest of the world. Many citizens never knew what a television looked like or many of the modern day things we have today. The citizens value their way of life and want to continue with their ways with the next generation of Tristans.

Watch the video below and see if you see what I saw. I saw a group of happy, hard working and charming people who happen to live in the world’s most isolated island. This looks like an amazing place to call home. I wouldn’t mind visiting there as not having much to do than walk around, hike, explore the ponds and interacting with the people would make me just as happy. It doesn’t take much to make me happy, I love simplicity. I know in the past, the citizens of Tristan would only receive mail once a year! But the last I heard, they have internet, so I’m sure communication is much faster now.


Video credit: David MacKenzie

There is another well done documentary that I will add below.
Tristan da Cunha Part 1

Tristan da Cunha Part 2

Now, when you reread my poem about “Tristan”, you’ll understand I was talking about the island the entire time. 🙂

xoxo

4 thoughts on “Why I wrote a poem about Tristan…

  1. Totally with you on the remote island fascination! I love the weird stories of how those societies have evolved. The Diomede Islands amaze me! Like the front line of the Cold War!

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